Category Archives: photo

Finally Seeing The Mandarin Duck

For as long as I have been going to Juanita Park, I have been hearing about the mandarin duck.  We have tons of wood ducks but there is one mandarin that lives in the bay.  Everyone talked about whether they had seen it.  However, it was never wherever I went.  Finally I broke that “duck” (apologies for the awful pun).  It was hanging out in the bay in nice lighting conditions and seemed busy playing with some root.  After this visit, I was back a little while later and there he was again.  I guess I am trusted enough now for him to hang out!

Argosy Still Hanging On

I bumped into a guy I had met before while at Fox Field outside Lancaster CA.  He had just arranged a ride out on to the ramp with one of the airport staff and invited me to come along.  One of the old airframes stored at Fox Field, near the air tanker ramp, is an old Armstrong Whitworth Argosy.  I have no idea of the history of this airframe and how it ended up here but here it is.  We were free to wander around and get some shots of it.

I understand it has been at Fox Field for a long time.  It isn’t going anywhere in a hurry but, courtesy of the dry climate, it is only decaying slowly.  I have no idea how long it will be before it becomes unsafe to have around any longer but I imagine it will be a while.  Definitely an unusual aircraft to get to shoot these days.

Shadows Of Dead Leaves

When fall arrives, we get a riot of color in the Pacific Northwest before the leaves fall.  When they do fall, we get a lot of them on our street and some of the leaves, when they get damp, leach out some chemicals on to the concrete of the sidewalk.  They leave a chemical shadow of their shape on the ground as they dry out and get blown away.  Over time, these marks get washed away but, for a while, we can see where the leaves have been.

Air Canada Special Early Sunday Departure And Lightroom Masking Options

Air Canada brings a pair of A220-300s in to SEA each evening – one from Toronto and one from Montreal.  They leave the following morning with the Toronto flight heading out early and the Montreal flight following a couple of hours later.  The Toronto flight one weekend was the TCA special aircraft so I decided to head out and catch it departing.

The day started very overcast and gloomy but there was a sign that things were going to get better.  This did happen but things were still not great when the jet departed.  The light had improved a bit but the cloud was still there.  When looking at the shots, I figured it was time to make use of the masking options that Lightroom offers.  The latest update has improved their usability somewhat.  First I drop the exposure of the shot overall to get the sky looking roughly how I want it.  Then I select the aircraft suing the Subject option.  It does a pretty reasonable job but I do then refine it with an addition brush to bring in the bits it has missed and a subtract brush to take out the detail areas where the mask has overlapped.

The new option is the click on this mask and choose the Duplicate and Invert option.  This gives me a sky selection that matches what I have got for the aircraft.  For the sky, I can work on the white balance to bring it back to something more cool which suits the overall look of the shot.  I can similarly work on the white balance for the jet to make the reds pop more in the livery.  The exposure can be brought up a bit with the shadows helping a little while bringing the blacks down while improve the contrast.

All of this is pretty straightforward.  One nice feature of the latest update is that you can actually apply the same settings to multiple images.  The brush adjustments are not going to work well for this so it is best to do the overall selections and sync to the various images and then, if a shot is worthy of further work, the refining of the mask can be done afterwards.  If you know which shot is the best, you can just focus on that one.

Motorcade Comes In The Back Gate

I was at Boeing Field awaiting the departure of the Vice President and was wondering when the motorcade would appear.  I had assumed it would drive down the road alongside the airport and in through the FBO’s entrance.  As I looked to the north, I could see that there was not traffic on I-5 southbound so I knew they weren’t far away.  The helicopter hovering above also suggested things were close.

Then I saw a bunch of flashing blue lights coming across the bridge near Ruby Chow Park.  I was a little confused by this but a short while later, I saw a string of vehicles with lights flashing coming along the taxiway alongside the main runway.  I assume that the Secret Service had elected to enter via one of the crash gates at the north end of the field.

The variety of vehicles was quite fascinating.  There were the heavily armored SUVs that the Veep was in.  These were followed by other SUVs, minivans and ambulances.  I guess the motorcade is equipped to cover any eventuality.  They crossed the runway and headed for the waiting C-32.  Not everyone was going on the C-32 though.  Various people would be on the C-40 that was also waiting while others would be picked up later or travel via different methods.  Watching the whole cavalcade arrive was quite a sight.

Sentimental Journey In Damper Conditions

Glorious weather had greeted the B-17, Sentimental Journey, when it came to Seattle.  The following week, it moved up to Arlington but was not so lucky.  The skies were pretty overcast and the air was more humid.  It didn’t make for great conditions to shoot a bare metal aircraft.  However, many times before, I have written here about how poorer conditions can sometimes be worthwhile.  This was one of those times.

I started off shooting from further up the field and, as the B-17 started her takeoff roll, it was clear that the props were pulling a fair bit of vapor from the air.  Consequently, I headed further down the field for the next flight.  This also provided a close look at the plane as it taxied out.  The real benefit came when the power was applied.  Vortices were streaming from the tips of the props and swirling back across the wings.  It is always a tricky call when trying to shoot in these conditions.  A good bit of prop blur is good as is a blurry background to emphasize speed but, this will result in the vortices being less defined.  A faster shutter speed helps make them stand out.  I tried to get a good balance with the speed I chose.

Camden Lock

Every once in a while, you have a moment when you realize something obvious.  I used to occasionally go to Camden Market when I lived in Town and I knew of Camden Lock but it never occurred to me that Camden Lock was called that because it had a lock.  How did that never register?  Anyway, it became obvious as we came to Camden during our walk along the Regents Canal.  There were the locks and a bridge over the top of them.  It was absolutely heaving with people.  Camden is a tourist magnet and so I was keen to keep moving through.  I did stop long enough to have a look at the locks, though.

F-35A Departure And Arrival

Over the course of the Seafair weekend, I got to see the demo F-35A arrive and depart a few times.  The demo pilot would get airborne and keep the jet on the deck in full burner building up a decent amount of speed.  Then, she would pull to a steep climb just as she got to the perimeter of the field.  This looked pretty impressive from the side but it was even more impressive from head on.

The return to land after the display was a lot more sedate.  It was a pretty standard pattern and approach but there were plenty of people at the south end to enjoy the last moments of the flight.  I headed down there a couple of times.  You could easily do both departure and approach since you had the whole time that the display was underway to re-position.  I did all go to Ruby Chow Park from one departure and shot video rather than stills.  Seeing the F-35 come right at us and then pull hard was impressive.  The noise was intense and the wake threw dust and debris into the air around us.  It made an impression!

Green Heron

The great blue herons are a regular feature of Juanita Bay but I had seen a few local photographers had managed to get shots of a green heron.  By the time I next visited the bay, I figured I might have missed out but was rather pleased when someone said the heron was in amongst the grasses.  It did mean he was hard to photograph since he was well concealed.  I figured this would be all I could get but there was some other creature in the grass – a rodent of some sort I think.  This spooked the heron and it flew out on to the log nearby and I was able to get a clear shot.  He squats down a bit when resting but, when relocating, the length of the neck was clear.  That is what allows the hunting to be successful when he lunges at his prey.

Lancaster Jets On Sticks

My friend, Paul, had advised me that Lancaster CA had a couple of aircraft on poles that were worth a look.  One is a retired Air Force test F-4 that sits at a busy intersection next to a rail station.  The other is a NASA F/A-18A that is at the entrance to a baseball stadium.  I decided to try and photograph both one evening when the light would be most favorable.

The guys hanging out near the F-4 looked a little perplexed as I drove up and started photographing this plane on a pole.  I think they didn’t see the interest in it that I did.  I think I attracted a few strange glances and I grabbed some shots and then headed back to the car.  The Hornet at the baseball stadium was a different story.  Not too many people around at that time so I took some shots and then headed off.  There was one more target of interest but that would have to wait for a morning visit.