Tag Archives: uk

Old British Locomotives

In the process of scanning so many old negatives, I come across shots that I had no idea I had taken.  When I still shot film, I would not go nuts taking shots but I was certainly willing to take a shot of anything that I found interesting at the time.  Since I had no idea that I was going to have a career in rail, I didn’t think trains would be very important.  However, I am an engineer at heart and any big mechanical items catch my interest.  It isn’t surprising that I found a few photos of trains.  Some of my old colleagues will find these of interest.  Others may just like them because they like trains.  My sister will probably like the Class 50 just because she used to commute to work behind them for a number of years!

Cosford’s Civil Collection

More from the film scanning archive.  I made a trip to the museum at RAF Cosford when I was visiting my friends Jon and Charlie in the area.  Now Jon works there but at the time it was just an extra to my visit.  At the time, British Airways had a collection of aircraft at the museum.  This included lots of their older types in storage.  Sadly, the cost of keeping the collection was not something BA management deemed worthwhile and they stopped funding it.  The museum couldn’t afford to keep them up so they were scrapped on site.  I wish I had a better record of them but this is all I have. Fortunately, others will have done better recording them.

Cliff Fall and Rock Strata

While staying in Norfolk, we took a walk along the beach at Hunstanton.  We parked up on the top of the cliffs and walked down the path to the beach.  Once down there, we were able to see the cliff rocks and they were pretty interesting.  The rocks had been laid down in strata are a gentle angle and looked really cool.  I guess they were eroding since we came upon what looked like a recent rockfall.  Of course, rocks do things in a lot slower time than us so it is entirely possible that these rocks had been lying there for ages but they did look pretty recent.

Avro York

The Avro Lancaster is a very famous bomber from the Second World War but its transportation derivative is a lot less well known.  Outside the aviation community, it is probably totally unknown.  It is the Avro York (War of the Roses comments are welcome) and it takes the flying surfaces and power plants of the Lancaster and mates them to a larger fuselage for transporting people.  It was an important type in the latter stages of the war and immediately afterwards.  This example is in the main hangar at the IWM Duxford.

Lavenham

We went to a bunch of villages in East Anglia that were picturesque but one was almost too much to be real.  I have been to Lavenham before – I went in the early 90s when visiting a friend who was living in the area at the time – but I have to admit I didn’t recall much about it and when we got there, I wondered how I could have forgotten.  It seems that the entire village is made up of buildings that were constructed by a film set designer.

Half timbered building abound.  They are all really old but well maintained.  Multiple colors are used to decorate the walls which I assume are probably made of some vintage materials.  Building construction in those days used to use a lot of straw mixed with “binding agents” of a less than delightful origin.  You don’t know that once they are done and I assume any more modern repairs make use of more pleasant ingredients.  The age of the buildings also shows in the way that there doesn’t appear to be a right angle in the place.  Everything is at odd angles.  It really is something special.

It is not hard to understand why tourists will visit the place.  It is just what someone from overseas would imagine an English village to be.  I certainly won’t so easily forget it this time.  Not sure how I did before!

VC-10 at Duxford

Duxford’s VC-10 has been there for many years.  When I first went there in the 80s, it was on display in the same BOAC colors that it currently wears.  However, I think, judging by the condition it is in now, it has undergone a repaint since I first saw it.  The VC-10 is something I didn’t see much of in civilian service.  The RAF examples where the ones I saw the most.  The Duxford example is a great way to see how they were in their original incarnation.

Framlingham Castle

Suffolk is full of castles.  A lot of groups fell out with each other and figured that castles were a necessary way to make sure you could take care of yourself.  Framlingham is one of the more substantial ones that I have seen.  There are multiple towers that surround the top of the hill with stout walls between them.  It would be interesting to see what it looked like when the castle was the center of the community.

It dominates the surrounding area as you would expect of a castle.  You can walk all along the top of the walls to complete a circle of the fortress and check out both the surrounding countryside and the large interior.  I’m not a huge fan of heights so wandering around on the top of the walls is something I do with some trepidation.  However, you go to these places to see everything so I’m not going to wimp out because of a little vertical drop!

Cranfield Jetstreams

I read that Cranfield is getting a new SAAB 340 to be used as a flying testbed.  It is replacing the current Jetstream 31.  The plane is used for test work but it is also used as a flying classroom for aeronautical engineering students.  The Jetstream 31 was an old BAE Systems airframe (one I was involved with in my days at Warton) and it replaced a Jetstream 200.  That old Astazou powered airframe was in use in the late 80s when I went through the course.  Here are shots of that old plane when we were using it as well as the current one when it showed up at RIAT.

CV-22 Display

I have seen plenty of MV-22B Ospreys in service with the Marine Corps but I haven’t see too many CV-22s with the Air Force.  One of the early ones was at Hurlburt Field when I visited years ago but we weren’t allowed to photograph it.  RIAT provided my first opportunity to shoot one in action.  I got some shots of it on arrival day but I was not pleased with the results for a lot of them.  I don’t know whether the focus was off or it was my struggles with the low shutter speed but I didn’t do too well.

They did display during the flying program, though, so I had a lot more chances to get some shots.  The extra lumps and bumps make this distinctive from the USMC version but it is still a hard thing to photograph if you want to get significant blur on those giant, slow turning props.  The different shade of gray they go with seems slightly more interesting than the Marine’s scheme too.

The Arrows’ Display Itself

I have posted a few times about the Red Arrows at RIAT covering their prep for display and post display.  I haven’t actually shared any good shots from the display itself.  Here are a few that I got over the course of the show.  Some were taken close to show center and others were taken from the end of the display line to give a different perspective on the same maneuvers.  They put on a great show and it is funny that, when you see them regularly, you get blasé but, when you haven’t seen them for a while, you come to appreciate the display a lot more.