Tag Archives: kpae

The Latest FedEx 767 On Test

I wasn’t close to the FedEx 767 as it came in and shot a missed approach but the low sun angle on the underside of the jet looked quite nice.  The crew flew a tight pattern back to make their approach and landing.  They did run reasonably long so I got to see them as they turned off the head back to the ramp.  They were going to take an earlier exit but something was in the way so I got a bit lucky.

Why Not Go For Low Shutter Speeds For Fun

A holiday visit to Paine Field saw that something interesting was heading for departure.  It was unlikely I would get across the field in time to catch it and I didn’t.  However, since I was there, I thought I might as well hang around for a bit and shoot some departures.  There were a few piston types heading out as well as a PC-12.  Since none of them were too important to me, I decided to play with shutter speeds around 1/100th of a second.  With the 500mm, this doesn’t result in a high keeper rate.

It does provide a lot of prop blur which was the point since, with no background, you aren’t getting any sense of speed.  It was more a case of seeing what I could get and having some panning practice.  When looking at the shots on the computer, some of them are clearly junk without much inspection.  Others look okay until you get zoomed in.  A few of them are sharp even zoomed right in and they are the ones that don’t get culled.

More on the Stored Southwest Jets

When the pandemic first hit in a big way, I wasn’t going anywhere to shoot but, once it was okay to make trips without interfacing with other people too much, I did got to Paine Field to see the stored Southwest 737s and I wrote about it in this post.  I was back up there recently and, while they have been cycling jets in and out, there are still a lot of their 737s parked there – predominantly but not only, 737-700s.

Some of them are up near the old cross runway and lined up in a good spot for a shot when the morning light is on them.  I was a little later than ideal but I still managed to get something.  Many of them are around near the FHCAM facility – still sadly closed and with no idea what the future might hold.  I had brought some steps which meant I could shoot over the fence.  The planes are really tight in there so I may a lot of use of panos to get decent coverage of the planes.  I did also get some of the planes further away.

The coverings on the openings on the airframes were pretty comprehensive.  Everything that is exposed has been taped over to prevent moisture or creatures getting in and causing harm.  There have been various stories coming out of the issues affecting planes that have been in storage for a long time so, while this prep is good, there will still be much to do when these planes are returned to service.  Meanwhile, Southwest is now taking delivery of its Max jets so it will be interesting to see how many of these planes do have a future.

What Is It With the Dorniers These Days?

The Pacific Northwest suddenly seems to have a bunch of Dornier 328Jet ops at the moment.  I posted here about one coming in to BFI.  I saw another one on the BFI ramp recently too and Paine Field had a visitor over the holidays.  The weather was pretty nice for this one when it showed up so I popped out to get a shot of it coming in.  I was not familiar with Taos Air.  They had made a couple of stops before arriving at Everett and departed for California shortly afterwards.  I wonder what the story was behind that?

XOJet Colors Change Again

I shot an XOJet Citation X at Paine Field over the holidays.  The light was at a nice low angle since it was not long after the shortest day and it picked out details on the airframe nicely.  I was surprised to see that the jet was in a grey paint finish.  I have shot a few XOJet Citation Xs over the years.  Some of the earlier ones were in a pretty standard looking livery, not unlike NetJets.

I then started to see them in an all white paint finish.  This was definitely not too exciting and had the look of someone that was ready to save money when they sold their jets without the need to repaint them.  The new scheme is not much better but at least it looks slightly more deliberate than a plane you couldn’t decide what to paint it.  I wonder if this is a new standard for them or just an oddball?

777X Line Up

The number of 777X airframes at Paine Field keeps growing.  I pictured some before in this post and, one morning over the holidays, I was up that was for something else and figured the morning light is good on the east side of the field where some stored jets are.  There are a bunch in a line along the disused cross runway so I got a shot or two before continuing with whatI had gone up there for.

First JASDF KC-46 Pegasus

The Japanese (JASDF) were a customer for the tanker version of the Boeing 767 when Boeing was offering it in the early days.  Japan and Italy were the only customers that I am aware of for that aircraft.  Therefore, it was not a massive surprise that Japan ordered the KC-46 when Boeing developed it for the USAF.  The first aircraft is now being completed and has been parked on the ramp up at Everett recently.  Here it is undergoing some testing.  Hopefully we shall get to see it flying soon.

Stored 777X Numbers Grow

While Boeing has delayed the entry to service date of the 777X, they have continued to produce airframes at Everett with the result being a number of stored airframes on the field.  There are four jets in the test program and the rest are not going to fly until certification is close so, for now, they are finding spaces across the airport for them.  Some are on the Boeing flight test ramp (with production of the other widebodies ramping down, space is more available I guess) while others are on the cross runway.  This has been home to 787s and 737 Max jets over the years and now it is the turn of the 777X.  Some of them are identifiable by the paint on the folded wing tips while others are unmarked for now.

Omni 767 Finds a Gap in the Clouds

For the second time this year, I was at Paine Field when an Omni Air International 767 showed up.  I wrote about the first time in this post.  On this occasion, it arrived in some quite blustery conditions but, as it was on final approach, a gap in the clouds opened up and provided some lovely light on the airframe while leaving the background dark and cloudy.  It makes for a far more interesting shot that would otherwise be the case on a day like that.

Landing a Southwest 737 in a Crosswind

This Southwest 737-700 was completing a test flight at Paine Field.  The crosswind was pretty strong so the pilot used the wing down approach to handling the crosswind.  They touched down on the starboard gear and bounced a bit before settling those wheels on the surface.  A short while later, they rolled wings level and the port gear made contact.  Aside from the bounce, a pretty good example of landing in a crosswind in a big jet.