Tag Archives: turboprop

Q400 Full Disc On The Props

I took this a long time ago but just came across it again.  I was under the approach path for SeaTac and one of the many Q400s that come in and out every day was setting up on final approach.  Since it was nothing special, I figured a low shutter speed was in order.  With the light on the front of the plane, this should show up the prop disc nicely.  It worked out pretty well.

DOJ Duo

The Department of Justice has a fleet of planes for doing whatever they need to do with them.  I think they move detainees around but presumably their staff also can travel on them for business purposes.  Anyway, I might not know what the details are but I do know they are inconspcuous looking planes (unless you count a plane white airframe as looking more out of place than one with some color on it).  Two came in to Boeing Field while I was there a while back.  One was a 757 and the other was an ATR.  I was in place for the 757 as it was on final approach although the sun did annoyingly go behind a cloud as it came by.  It did depart alter but I was actually driving when that happened so no shots.  The ATR caught me out completely.  I had just pulled up after being away for a bit and was still sitting in the car switching the engine off as a white turboprop sailed by.  No chance to even get out of the vehicle let alone grab a shot.  That was actually the one I would have preferred but it was not to be.

KLM Vickers Viscount

First up, a disclaimer.  This is one of the few (only?) photos on the blog that I didn’t take.  When you look at it, that should be pretty clear.  I have been working through a scanning job of old negatives and slides that my parents took.  A few shots I took too with their cameras but that is off topic.  In the process of scanning these shots, I came across a few aviation shots.  (Thanks Mum for taking some shots of RAF Hawks at Chivenor in the camo days while she was traveling passed there!). My parent made a trip to the Netherlands long before I was born and they flew there on a KLM Vickers Viscount.  My Dad kindly thought to take a picture of the plane knowing that, decades later, I would be delighted to find it.  Nice job!

Anchorage Props

I put together a post about some interesting jet traffic at Anchorage from a visit I made long ago.  While jet freighters are a big deal at Anchorage, the area is also known for its more unusual prop traffic.  Some of these are vintage and others are types that have fallen out of favor elsewhere but continue to have a use in Alaska.  Here are some shots of the various props I got to see while on that trip in the mid-2000s.

NOAA Back In Town

A couple of years ago, a NOAA Gulfstream was operating in the area for a while and I managed to get some shots of it that were shared in this post.  That Gulfstream had a couple of interested radomes fitted.  Another part of the NOAA fleet is a WP-3D Orion.  It also has some interesting radomes and antennae installed.  It is based in Florida – there are usually storms to follow on that side of the country.  However, the Pacific has its share of storms too and NOAA studies them as well.

Consequently, NOAA recently deployed the WP-3D to Alaska to pay attention to some weather activity out in the ocean.  They staged it through Boeing Field to split the journey up there in two.  I was waiting for it when it arrived.  The conditions had been pretty overcast but, with a late in the day arrival, the cloud cover was starting to break up and the sun popped out just in time for its arrival.  An interesting airframe with a nice color scheme.  It headed on the following day but I couldn’t be there for that.

Kenmore Caravan on the Short Runway

Kenmore’s floatplane operations are the best known part of their business but they have a lot of flights using the Cessna Caravan from land bases.  One of them returned to their Boeing Field base while I was there.  The Caravan is perfectly capable of using the short runway at the airport and, with plenty of traffic using the main runway, this one came in on the short side.  That brought it closer to me so I was pretty happy about it.

Where It All Began for Gulfstream

Everyone always associates the Gulfstream brand with business jets.  These days that is all that they make but it started out with a turboprop.  The first Gulfstream was a straight winged plane with a low set tailplane and a pair of Rolls Royce Dart turboprops for power.  If you look at the airframe, it is not hard to see how it was married to a new wing, power plants and empennage to create the G-II,  However, the turboprop is the original.  I remember seeing Ford’s aircraft operating from Stansted to their European bases.  However, I have rarely shot one of the originals.

I have two that were operating at different locations but, judging by the registrations, they are probably from the same operator.  Not much diversity there.  I also have shots of an old NASA airframe stored as part of the Pima Air Museum’s collection.  Not sure whether it has been reassembled at this point or not but, hopefully, one of the locals there can let me know.  This was the beginning of a long line of top of the range bizjets.

Spanish Hercules Retirement

I understand that the Spanish Air Force is retiring (or has retired) their C-130 fleet.  I guess with the A400Ms coming into service, the Hercs were done.  I have not had much interaction with Spanish C-130s but here are a couple of shots to mark their end of service.

A Spanish Air Force KC-130 Hercules launches out of Nellis AFB to provide refueling support to a Red Flag mission.

MC-130 on Exercise

In this previous post about the hangars at Moffett Field, I mentioned that I was there to cover an exercise.  The MC-130s were a big part of the exercise.  They were loading up and launching down to remote landing strips on the California coast.  The holds were full of equipment including off road vehicles.  Loading these up was a tight fit.  While the crews spent time getting everything ready to go, I was reasonably free to wander around the airframe and get some shots.

Here are some that I got that day.  These were some of the oldest Combat Shadow (and maybe Hercules) airframes around at the time and I suspect that they have been replaced by now, I think by Combat King J models.

Turbine Beaver

There is no shortage of DHC Beavers in the PNW, even of the turbine variety.  Plenty of them are on floats, too, so even that doesn’t make it particularly special.  However, when you haven’t been able to shoot much aviation for a long time, one is a welcome sight.  Even better when it switches to the closer runway when on approach.