Tag Archives: museum

Drone Control Meatbox

When Llanbedr was the home for a bunch of drones, it also had some old airframes used to support the drone operations.  The Sea Vixen was one of the more famous jets saved from that program but the Boscombe collection has a drone support Meteor.  The red and yellow paint scheme is not subtle but it looks good, particularly in the dark hangar at Old Sarum where the collection lives.  I can’t claim to love the Meatbox but I do find it an interesting jet and seeing one in such good condition is a treat.

Back to Erickson At Madras

In 2015, I made a trip to Madras Oregon for an air-to-air photography course.  Based at the Erickson museum, we had an interesting few days discussing the approach to air to air photography as well as the chance to get some shots while airborne.  I had a good look around the museum while I was there as well but I was looking forward to a chance to check it out again when we headed south through Oregon.  Madras was on our route from Hood River to Klamath Falls so it was a definite stop.

We didn’t have a huge amount of time available to spend at the museum but we had enough to get a reasonable look around.  They were busy preparing aircraft since they were taking a few planes to the show at Klamath Falls that we were going to see.  As a result, some of the planes were either out on the ramp or at the front of the hangar being prepped for their ferry south.

There seemed to be more planes than I remembered from my previous trip and things were definitely squeezed in.  Of course, it might just be my memory not being up to par. The more unusual types like the Bellanca or the Mauler are always worth a look but everything in the collection looks great.

Hood River Museum

The Oregon trip with Mark provided a lot of options for additional aviation experiences while we were en route to the main event in Klamath Falls.  This included a stop off at Hood River to check out the museum there.  I had heard that it was an impressive collection of both planes and cars and that was no understatement.  When it comes to older aircraft, I am well out of my depth.  My interest in aviation came out of the military side of things in the 80s and the era of WWII and before was not something I paid any attention to.

The result of this is that a museum like Hood River is full of aircraft that I know nothing about.  I couldn’t identify many of them if asked and, when there are many variants of a given make, I don’t recognize what distinguishes them and whether one or other of them is significantly rarer than any other.  Instead, I just find it interesting to look at the wide variety of looks and finishes that the planes have.

The Hood River museum certainly provides me plenty to choose from in that regard.  There are so many aircraft in there and, while they have several hangars, it is not unfair to say that things are pretty on top of each other in order to get everything to fit in.  It is also a little dark but, since modern cameras are so good in low light conditions, this isn’t really a problem anymore.

Mark and I are both plane guys so the car collection was not a big focus for us.  We did take a look at to some of the vehicles that were there but, since we had a schedule to keep if we were to get to Klamath Falls in time for some dinner, we had to focus on the planes.  There is no way I could cover the collection in one blog post and I won’t even try.  Instead, I shall provide a tiny selection of what we saw.  Maybe, as I work through some of the shots, I shall revisit the collection in some future posts.

CF-100 Canucks in Museums

I can’t recall what prompted all of this but I found myself searching through my photos to see if I had any pictures of Avro Canada CF-100 Canucks.  I knew I had seen one at the Imperial War Museum at Duxford but had I seen any others?  I had been looking at the Wikipedia article on them as part of this theme and had seen where the remaining examples are.  Turns out I had also seen one in Castle AFB museum.  It’s a curious looking type but here are some shots including the IWM example from thirty years ago as well as last year.

Vintage Japanese Rolling Stock

Here are some old Japanese rail vehicles.  These are part of the SCMaglev museum in Nagoya that I visited when I was in Japan last summer.  The museum has a great selection of Shinkansen equipment across the generations but it also has a lot of other rail vehicles from long ago.  The vehicles clearly look old from the outside but the interiors are really an interesting comparison with what you see these days.  The amount of wood in the paneling and the materials of the seating are definitely of their time.  I was quite amused by the fans mounted on the ceiling.  Obviously pre-air conditioning days with these cars and so a bit of air circulation was all you could hope for.  Knowing how incredibly hot it gets in Japan during the summer, they would not have done much for the riders I would have thought.  I wonder whether it was as crowded in those days as it is now.  If it was even close, that would have been brutal.

Pueblo Museum

Well over 10 years ago, I was invited by a rail vehicle manufacturer to an industry event that they were holding to promote one of their vehicles.  It was held at the TTCI test facility outside Pueblo in Colorado.  Pueblo also has an aviation museum so it was inconceivable that I would go all that way and not check it out while I was there.

Most of the exhibits are outside in some pretty harsh sun so they are rather sun-bleached.  There is an interesting mix of old types on display while a few are indoors and look in better condition.  Helicopters and vintage fighters are always going to be good for me so hopefully there is something in here you like.

The Edwards Museum

Edwards AFB has been the home to an amazing range of interesting aircraft types.  Many of them have found their way to prominent museums around the country given the significance of what they achieved.  Others never found interest and got disposed of.  Some never lasted long enough to be preserved given the hazardous nature of what they did.  However, there was a storage program for the rest and Edwards has a museum of some of these preserved airframes.

I haven’t been to Edwards for a long time so I don’t know what the current situation is with the collection but I did get to check it out on a previous visit.  The collection was mainly front line types that had been used for testing purposes.  (This is the USAF side of things rather than the NASA collection.)  There are some types there that I didn’t see which I would like to have done like the YA-7F.  However, there was a test A-7D with an air data boom.  Here are some of the shots I got that day.  I also shot a couple of other jets that were away from the rest but these were only with my phone and phone quality in those days was not what it is now.

Cosford’s Civil Collection

More from the film scanning archive.  I made a trip to the museum at RAF Cosford when I was visiting my friends Jon and Charlie in the area.  Now Jon works there but at the time it was just an extra to my visit.  At the time, British Airways had a collection of aircraft at the museum.  This included lots of their older types in storage.  Sadly, the cost of keeping the collection was not something BA management deemed worthwhile and they stopped funding it.  The museum couldn’t afford to keep them up so they were scrapped on site.  I wish I had a better record of them but this is all I have. Fortunately, others will have done better recording them.

The Original Doctor Yellow

The Tokaido Shinkansen service requires regular inspection of the track to ensure it is up to the high standards required of high speed service.  JRC operates an inspection train called Doctor Yellow.  It is a highly instrumented version of the current trains.  I have seen the current Doctor Yellow when I was at one of JRC’s maintenance facilities.  However, the original Doctor Yellow was based on the Series 0 trains.  It is now preserved in the SC Maglev museum in Nagoya along with many of the other Shinkansen designs.

The Train That Started It All

The Japanese Shinkansen trains introduced in the 1960s became known around the world as bullet trains.  The shape of them was well known, often photographed with Mt Fuji in the background.  While other countries developed high speed rail, the Japanese bullet train was often the first one people would associate with the topic.  These first trains are known as the Series 0.  There have been several iterations of design since.  However, the Series 0 is still very recognizable to me and probably others of my generation.

I had seen a Series 0 vehicle once before.  I visited the Nippon Sharyo factory is Toyokawa many years ago and they have a cab vehicle on display by the main gate.  Sadly, I wasn’t able to get a photograph of that then.  Seeing an example at the SC Maglev museum was my second opportunity.  It was displayed alongside a number of the more recent iterations of the Shinkansen but, judging by the number of people taking photos of it, it still has a strong level of recognition.