Tag Archives: structure

Nagoya Bridge

When I headed south out of the center of Nagoya to go to the museum, my route took me down to the docks area.  A highway along the water obviously needed to clear the route for the larger ships so a pretty impressive bridge had been constructed.  It is called the Meiko-Chuo Bridge.  I could only get a good view of it from the train but it was in the background when you were at the museum.  I thought it looked pretty spectacular.

Bridge Perspectives

Walking under the bridges along the Riverwalk in Chicago provides a very different perspective that that which you get from above.  Some of the bridges have solid deck and others have gridded metal decks which allow light through (and anything else someone might drop).  The lattice structures under the deck are ornate yet grubby.  They are obscured from most views and get covered in the grime that washes down from above.  I am not making this sound very appealing but I find them very cool to look at.  The noise of the traffic above is there but slightly isolated which adds to the atmosphere for me.  They do put a curved stainless-steel cover over the walkway itself so you are not vulnerable to anything from above ending up on your head which is something I am grateful for.

Nozzle Details on Titan IV

The missile display at Evergreen Aerospace Museum is impressive.  They have sourced a lot of different types and they have a Titan IV section lying on its side.  You can get up close to the nozzle of the rocket motor and it is a cool thing to see in detail.  Looking from a distance, they look very simple but, once you are close up, the complexity of the structure and the cooling structure to stop the plume from burning right through the nozzle are really impressive.  The shaping of the nozzle itself, in contrast, is very simple.  The expansion ratios are calculated carefully and the profile is a smooth transition to minimize the losses.  Quite the contrast.

Ice Emphasis to Structure of the A330

An Aeroflot Airbus A330 landed at LAX while I was shooting there.  On plenty of occasions, I have seen ice on the underside of the wings of landing aircraft where the cold fuel remaining in the tanks has caused condensation and freezing in the warmer damp air lower down.  However, I haven’t ever noticed it on the fuselage structure.  On this jet, though, I could see ice on the surface and the patterns of ice reflected the underlying fuselage structure.  Maybe this is there more often and it was just the paint finish that made it show up this time.

Hangar Structure Remnants

Tillamook in Oregon is well known as a home of cheese production.  It is also home to an airfield that was once a base for naval airship operations.  Two massive hangars were built to house the huge airships in the days before they went out of favor as a patrol vehicle.  One of them remains and is the home of a museum amongst other things.  The other hangar is long gone.  However, traces of it remain.

The structure of these large hangars was predominantly wood but there were some concrete elements.  Each end of the hangar had huge rolling doors and the posts to support that system were large concrete structures.  Meanwhile, the arches along the length of the hangar were rooted in concrete bases.  While the wood from the hangar has been taken away, the concrete sections remain.  Whether they were too difficult to remove or just not worth the cost, I don’t know.  What I do know is that they are still there and other things have moved in to operate within their footprint, in this case a lumber yard.

I include a picture of the remaining hangar for reference so you can see where the various structural elements exist within the finished building in case it is not immediately apparent.  When we first passed by this location on a trip about ten years ago, it took me some time to work out what these strange items were.

Pemberton Community Barn

A short drive north of Whistler brings you to a town called Pemberton.  It is a little town and right in the center is a public barn structure.  It is a modern structure and it has been built to provide a venue for the community to use.  It has open sides so anyone can walk in from any direction.  An event was being set up while we were there.  It looked like it might have been a wedding.  The wooden structure is very attractive and it appears that it gets a lot of use.  What a great focus for the community.

Cliffwalk – A Feat of Engineering

One more post from our visit to Capilano.  The deep valley that the river runs through and that the bridge crosses has some steep, rocky sides.  These have provided another opportunity for the owners to add some interest.  They have mounted a walkway along the cliff face.  I don’t know what inspired this but if you have seen the walkway at the Grand Canyon or the glass boxes on the Sears Tower (watcha talking about Willis) then you see a similar them.

These paths run on structure built in to the cliff face.  They are shaped so, while you have normal width handrails, the foot section is narrower so you have a more obvious view downwards.  You have no doubt how high up you are.  Meanwhile, you get to see the mounting points that have been driven into the cliff face to support all of this.

One section of the path is a semi-circle that is suspended by cables mounted on the cliff face.  It is a dramatic part of the structure and everyone is fascinated by it when they get there.  Don’t anticipate moving through this section too quickly because it does tend to back up a bit.  A little later I walked above this section and found a spot where you can look directly down on the curve and it takes on a whole new perspective.  I think it is quite beautiful.  Winding your way along the face of the cliffs on these walkways is very cool and is definitely not to be overlooked if you visit.

Hwy 99 Crosses the Water

To get from Seattle to Fremont, you have to cross the water.  Highway 99 runs across a high bridge to get from one side to the other.  Being underneath the bridge you have a very different perspective on things.  It is an old bridge structure with concrete piers supporting the roadway.  From underneath, the symmetry of the structure is quite appealing.  What is apparent when you are there but is not so clear in a picture is the steepness of the hill as it drops away down to the water.  The gradient is pretty dramatic.  The bridge does climb a bit but the ground falls away far faster.

What Happened to the Old Bridge?

Walking across the bridge from the overflow parking to the top of Snoqualmie Falls, I looked down the river to the top of the falls just beyond the barriers to stop errant boaters getting too close.  I also noticed something in the water below us.  For a while I was trying to work out what it was.  Then, courtesy of polarizing glasses, I could see through the reflections and make out the shape of some structure.

It looks to me like this was a previous bridge.  It sits just below the current bridge alignment and looks like it would have been the right size and shape to be a bridge span.  I wonder whether it collapsed or whether, when the replacement bridge was being built, it was simpler to dump the old span into the river than to take it away.  There could be another explanation of course and maybe it isn’t even part of a bridge.  However, it clearly is something man-made sitting on the bed of the river.

Gas Works Park

In the days before natural gas, the gas supplies for towns and cities came from making gas from other sources such as coal.  Gas works were a big feature of towns.  However, they have disappeared as natural gas replaced them.  The huge metallic structures have been taken away and the land has found new purposes.  Seattle managed to both find a new use and keep the works.

The north end of Lake Union has Gas Works Park.  Much of the gas works has been cleared away but substantial chunks of the metal work remain in place.  Some is cordoned off but other parts have been integrated into displays.  We both commented on the complexity of the pipes and valves and how everything had a role.  The geometry of the structures and the connecting pipework were great to look at.  The middle of the day is not the best time to photograph this so I will think about coming back at some point to have a wander around specifically for photography.  However, on a sunny day, a park by the lake with tons of people seemed to be a very relaxing place compared to how this would have been when it was in use.