Tag Archives: ferry

Boats Look Better At A Distance

When photographing the ferries at Edmonds, the sun was very low in the sky and was coming on to the boat at an oblique angle.  This shows up something that is not obvious about ships from far away but is really obvious when you get close to them.  Take a look at a large ship from far away and it may look like a smooth sided creation.  However, ships are constructed from plates of steel being welded together and, when you get close to them, this becomes a lot more apparent.  The individual panels are far from smooth and the joins where they are welded together are a bit “agricultural”.  Get the light on them at a shallow angle and this is pretty clear.

Uzbekistan Dreamliner Delivery

Rarity value of Boeing’s production jets is a nice feature of living here.  The 787 line is closing at Everett but there are still plenty of jets to be delivered as a result of some production quality issues.  An Uzbekistan Dreamliner was built last year and I saw its colorful livery on the flight line a while back.  It was finally lined up to depart recently so I decided to watch it go.  It had done some test flying in lovely light in the preceding days but I was unable to be there for that.

The conditions weren’t as nice as they had been previously but they were okay and it did mean that the heat haze which is a big deal at this time of year was not such a factor.  They were departing to the north so came out of the South Gate of the Boeing ramp and taxied to the south end of the field.  A long flight home means plenty of fuel but also no payload so a pretty early rotation.  Even so, managed to get some shots of a jet I am unlikely to see again.

Early Morning with the Edmonds Ferries

After our aborted trip on the Edmonds ferry, I figured that the morning light would be good on the ferries as they arrived and departed.  Rather than bore Nancy that day, I figured an early morning visit would make more sense – assuming that the weather was nice.  We had a steady stream of nice weather for a week so, early one morning, I headed back to Edmonds.

At this time of year, the sun is a little further north than appropriate to get light on the side of the ferry while it is in the terminal.  However, as soon as it leaves, it turns to the south slightly to head across to Kingston.  The light soon gets on to the right side of the boat.  It is nice to still have a bit of snow on the top of Olympics which provides a bit of a more interesting background.

You can see across to Kingston from Edmonds and the morning light made the view across pretty clear.  I was surprised how well you could see the ferry departing the other terminal as well as the stored ferry on that side.  As they crossed in the middle, it was easy to get the two of them in one shot.  The morning light also brings out some texture on the side of the ferries but that is going to get its own post.

Anderson Island Ferry

My lockdown interest in different ferry operations continues unabated.  Since I was down at Nisqually checking out the wildlife refuge, I figured I was close to Steilacoom which is the home of a ferry service provided by Pierce County.  This one operates across to Anderson Island – a location where some friends of ours have a place.  It occasionally stops at a smaller island too but that is not a frequent service.

There were two ferries tied up at the dock when I got there.  One was the Christine Anderson and it was the one in use.  The other was called Steilacoom II and I wonder whether that is an older ferry that is kept in reserve.  Not long after I arrived, the ferry departed.  I hadn’t positioned well to catch it but it turned immediately and headed south so was soon visible away from the other dock vessels.  I got myself some lunch while I waited for it to return.  The sun was out and the conditions were lovely as it made its way back to Steilacoom.  However, a big cloud bank rolled in at just the wrong time and, as it got close to its destination, it was suddenly in shade that did not make for good photos.  The Tacoma Narrows Bridge in the background was still bathed in good light though.  One more ferry to add to the tally!

Ferry Videos in Blustery Conditions

I have posted a couple of times with ferries at Guemes Island and Lummi Island.  While I mainly was shooting stills at these locations, I did get some video too.  When the boats are being tossed about, I figured that video was a better way of conveying what the conditions were like.  Below are a couple of videos I edited of the two ferries.

Lummi Island Ferry

Having made a return trip to Anacortes to check out the dilapidated ship hills on the shore, I decided to add to my ferry collection.  Just beyond Bellingham is an Indian Reservation called the Lummi Nation.  Just off the coast is Lummi Island and there is a little car ferry that connects the island to the Nation.  The ferry is called the Whatcom Chief and it is operated by the county.  It isn’t a big ferry – it looks to hold about 16 cars – but the crossing is not long and they apparently will run extra services to clear a backlog of vehicles if needed beyond the scheduled services.

It was just as windy up at Lummi as it had been in Anacortes but it lacked the sun that I had experienced down there.  Rain showers were blowing through periodically and it was a lot less enjoyable to be outside!  However, I’d come all that way so I wasn’t going to miss out on the shots.  As I mentioned, the ferry is not large and, with the wind whipping up some waves, it was bouncing around as it made the crossing.  I guess you want to hose the salt water off your car after a crossing on a day like this since the spray was going across the boat as it pitched and rolled.

There were more cars waiting to make the crossing than there was space for so they squeezed as many as they could onboard and then headed back again.  Hopefully they came right back for the remainders but I had got what I needed, had a decent drive home ahead of me and wanted to warm up so it was back in the car for me.

Guemes Island Ferry

Since aviation photography has been limited over the last year, I am finding myself photographing passenger ferries a lot.  Having photographed some, I now am finding out about different ferry operations in the area and checking them out too.  Anacortes is well known for the Washington State Ferries terminal that serves the San Juan Islands and Victoria (when the border is open) but it also has another ferry service.  Just across the water from Anacortes is Guemes Island.  The only way to get there is via a ferry.

The crossing is not a long one and you can see across to the other terminal with ease.  The ferry is a basic boat with a car deck for vehicles and a small structure for the operators.  I assume there is some shelter for foot passengers too but I didn’t spot it immediately.  With such a short crossing, there are no special facilities.

As you come down the hill, you look along the loading ramp and straight at the other terminal.  I saw a bunch of cars lined up to cross.  It didn’t appear that they would all get on so I guess they shuttle back and further pretty regularly.  It appeared to be half hourly.  As they made the crossing, the boat seemed to roll quite a bit.  It didn’t look like the smoothest of crossings.  I guess the boat is designed to be sufficient for the sheltered waters but I wouldn’t like to be on it in rough weather.  Then again, the crossing is short so you could suck it up if it was rolling about.  Maybe I will take a trip across some time and explore the island.

Ferries in the Mist

The misty mornings at Orcas were not only pretty atmospheric to wake up to but they also could make for interesting shots of the ferries.  As the banks of fog rolled in and out, the boats could disappear and reappear.  As they backed out and spun around, they could be right on the edge of disappearing.  Since we were facing south, the whole scene was backlit which made it look even more interesting.

Experimenting With Night Shots of Ferries

With the ferries coming and going to the terminal at Orcas, I was able to have plenty of chances to take photos.  I did get standard shots of the boats in low light conditions.  They are not easy to shoot since they are constantly moving.  No long exposures at low ISOs are possible so it is high ISO and the associated noise.  However, I did decide to experiment with some long exposures and blending of shots.  The boats make a curving approach to the terminal.  I thought this might make a nice long exposure.  It worked okay but the curve is a bit disguised by being too low down to really appreciate it.  However, it was fun to try.

Bonus Santa Blog Post

Christmas Eve and I was down by the water in Mukilteo.  My timing couldn’t have been better.  I made a discovery that will come as a surprise to many of you.  You may have thought that Santa rode in a sleigh on Christmas Eve (at night too), flying through the air pulled by his reindeer.  I have news for you all.  That isn’t true!  Everyone has been lying to you all these years.  How do I know?  Because I saw Santa.

Turns out Santa’s preferred mode of transport is a paddle board.  The reindeer do pull him along on his board but they do so from a small boat and they might look a bit like people wearing reindeer antlers.  Santa did spend a bit of time getting ready.  I’m sure it wasn’t because he was putting on appropriate clothing for being out on the water in December.  He just wanted to make sure he looked the part.  A mask was also in order so he might have trimmed the beard.

He got on to the board prior to the reindeer being ready.  A bit of paddling around until it was time to hook the tow line on from the boat the reindeer were using.  With everyone aboard, they headed out in to the water and started motoring around near the lighthouse.  The ferries were crossing in the background but Santa was not going to tangle with them.  I had to head off after they made a couple of passes along the waterfront but I assume they were off around the world to start delivering presents.