Tag Archives: british airways

British Airways 787-10

I saw the 787-10 development aircraft flying and caught a couple during the hurricane evacuation but I haven’t seen many in service.  British Airways has started using their 787-10s on the Seattle run so, with some nice weather on a Sunday afternoon combined with a northerly flow, I decided to see whether I could get a decent Mt Rainier shot of one arriving.  It was a warm day so heat haze was an issue but nothing can be done about that.  They showed up on time so I grabbed some shots and retreated to the air conditioning of the car.  This will be a regular sight in future so nothing significant about it but one to add to the archive.

Cosford’s Civil Collection

More from the film scanning archive.  I made a trip to the museum at RAF Cosford when I was visiting my friends Jon and Charlie in the area.  Now Jon works there but at the time it was just an extra to my visit.  At the time, British Airways had a collection of aircraft at the museum.  This included lots of their older types in storage.  Sadly, the cost of keeping the collection was not something BA management deemed worthwhile and they stopped funding it.  The museum couldn’t afford to keep them up so they were scrapped on site.  I wish I had a better record of them but this is all I have. Fortunately, others will have done better recording them.

SeaTac Widebody Evening Arrivals

I was out one evening awaiting the arrival of something that currently escapes my memory.  In the meantime, I was in position to get the arrival of a few widebodies.  Since SeaTac tends to put the widebodies on the inner runway, they are the ones you can get from this park location while almost everything else (plus the occasional wide body!) goes to the outer runway behind you and through the trees.

On this evening, we had four widebodies come in.  Condor brought their regular 767 flight.  This were joined by an Air China Cargo Boeing 747-400F, a FedEx 777F and last but by no means least, a British Airways 747-400.  The evening light was very favorable and this location is both easily accessible and pretty good for this approach.

BOAC and the Red Arrows

RIAT is known for special formations and British Airways has been part of them in the past.  Concorde with the Red Arrows and an A380 with the Red Arrows spring to mind.  For 2019 and BA’s 100th anniversary, they wanted to do something special.  The focal point was to be the BOAC liveried 747-400.  I shot this jet at SeaTac and covered it in this post.  To see it in formation with the Red Arrows sounded pretty good.  They put together two passes.

The first was from the right and involved a gentle turn in the direction of the crowd to give a slightly topside view of things.  This was nice but the distance involved did mean there was a bit of heat haze to combat.  The second pass in the other direction was a more straight pass along the display axis.  The sun was popping in and out during this time so the colors popped sometimes and not others.  It made for some tricky shooting but it still looked pretty good and it was nice to just watch when not shooting.

Cloudy Isn’t Always Bad

I was looking to get some midsummer shooting in at Vancouver.  The day was a lovely one but the evening promised so overcast rolling in and that proved to be the case.  However, I thought I would give things a go.  The lack of the strong evening light was disappointing but it did actually make for some softer lighting conditions and things weren’t all bad.  The evening culminated (at least for me) with three quick arrivals.  An Edelweiss A340-300, a BA A380 and a China Airlines A350-900.  I quite liked the conditions as they provided something slightly different.  Clouds shouldn’t necessarily be a deterrent from an evening out shooting.

BA A380 Arrives a Bit Late – Good!

The day I was at YVR, the BA A380 was a bit late against schedule.  Since the light improves significantly later in the evening – nice soft light, warmth and more to the north side – this was considered a win rather than something to complain about.  If all of the heavy arrivals could have been a bit delayed and shown up in the best light, that would have been perfect!  There wasn’t any significant heat haze which made shots further up the approach surprisingly sharp which was nice.  Then touchdown in front of you with all of those tires smoking in sequence rounds things out well.

Back How it Was Delivered

The BOAC retro jet that BA has painted up was a nice treat to get.  There are two other retro jets in other colors but, based on their interior configuration, they should not normally be used on the Seattle route.  Therefore, I wasn’t expecting a chance to get them any time soon.  Then, I saw that the Landor scheme aircraft was coming to SeaTac.  It must have been a substitution.  Now I was interested.  However, it pushed off the gate at Heathrow and then went back on with some engine start issue.  Was it going to scrub?

Apparently not.  The issue was resolved and they pushed again.  While the passengers were, no doubt, unimpressed by this, I was delighted.  It now meant the arrival was at nearly 7pm.  No problem to get to SeaTac after work and the light might be really nice.  The weather was better than forecast although the chance of Mt Rainier making a second appearance was low.  Again, plenty were out for the arrival.  She showed up on the approach and the light played ball.  This jet would have been delivered to BA with these colors so it was a case of reverting to how she had appeared many years before.

Been a While Since I Saw a BOAC Jet

When I was very young, BOAC still existed but it was soon merged in to British Airways.  I remember model kits being for BOAC jets and I have seen some preserved aircraft in BOAC colors.  As part of British Airways’ 100th year celebrations, they have painted up four airframes in legacy colors.  The first to appear was a 747-400 in the BOAC scheme.  I saw a bunch of shots of it online and was keen to see it for myself.  It appeared on the schedule for an evening arrival at SeaTac so I made sure to be down there.

They were making a southerly flow that day and the evening is not a good time for that approach path as there are few locations to get good shots.  However, I was “lucky” in that it was a crummy day for weather.  The water tower location would normally have been horribly backlit but, since there was no sun, it might just do.  I did get the shots and, by virtue of shooting quite heavily overexposed and then pulling back in post, I was able to get something I was reasonably pleased with.

I did really want the sun though and, not two weeks later, the jet was back on the SeaTac run.  Again the evening arrival but this time it was sunny and the flow was northerly.  This provides some opportunities for getting the iconic SeaTac arrival shot with Mt Rainier in the background.  I was certainly not alone as she came down the approach nicely illuminated by the evening light.  Thank goodness for time changes and being done with work by then!

BA QOTS Over the Bay

This is just a gratuitous Boeing 747 post.  The jets are fast disappearing from service with the major airlines but British Airways (those of you that call them British Air just stop!) has a substantial number of them left and they are due to stay around for a few more years.  This one was arriving at SFO in 2018.  It came into view across Coyote Point and headed down the approach in nice winter light.  There will come a time when they are gone so appreciate it now.  I have flown on more of them than I can recall so have plenty of happy memories of traveling on them.

My Rainier Arrivals

I was picking up someone from SeaTac just before Christmas.  The flight was due in just before sunset so I took the camera along just in case.  I was out by the outer runway approach path but the heavies were coming in to the inner runway.  This meant they passed nicely in front of Mt Rainer – assuming you can ignore the 60 odd miles distance to the mountain.  First in was a Condor 767 which still had plenty of evening light on it as it landed.

Next up was a British Airways 777.  It arrived as the light was fading fast.  It still had a bit of illumination but you knew anything following it would be in the gloom.  Being winter, there was virtually no distortion in the atmosphere, which, given the distance was a potential problem.  Things looked pretty sharp in the final images.